Productive few days in the studio by Cameron Jarvis

I decided to spend the night in the studio, partly because I have so much to do, but mainly because I wanted to try working on a painting as the first thing I do in the morning, without having to eat or walk to school between waking up and getting ideas down on canvas

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These are the two paintings I worked on first thing in the morning. They are both based on a park that's just south of my house. I've become interested in parks and courtyards as places that are public, but have an element of privacy or safety. With these paintings I am trying to let go of the goal of close realism that I've had while making my previous cityscape paintings. Both are based on drawings I made on site.

Painting in the neighborhood by Cameron Jarvis

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I finally made it out to do some painting from life in my neighborhood. I think there is something important about recording my surroundings, and making a painting is also a very interesting way to occupy a space. This statue of a black family is in a little square just south of my house. I was sitting on a bucket with my painting leaning on the ground for about 2 hours, and a few people came by on their Sunday routines. I got to meet several of my neighbors, and heard a little bit about the history of the statue and of the neighborhood. Nobody was able to tell me about the person who made it, so I'll have to do some digging in my own. The best part of the experience was seeing how proud and happy people were that someone was interested enough in this piece of art to come and make an image of it.  

In response to a short NPR piece commemorating the integration of Central High School by the Little Rock Nine by Cameron Jarvis

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    From a report by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Left: This combination of file photos shows the nine black teenagers who had to be escorted by federal troops past an angry white mob and through the doors of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, on Sept. 25, 1957. Top row from left are Minnie Brown, Elizabeth Eckford and Ernest Green; middle row, Thelma Mothershed, Melba Pattillo and Gloria Ray; bottom row, Terrence Roberts, Jefferson Thomas and Carlotta Walls. Right: Top row from left are Minnijean Brown Trickey, Elizabeth Eckford and Ernest Green; middle row, Thelma Mothershed Wair, Melba Pattillo Beals and Gloria Ray Karlmark; bottom row, Terrence Roberts and Carlotta Walls LaNier.

 

 

From a report by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Left: This combination of file photos shows the nine black teenagers who had to be escorted by federal troops past an angry white mob and through the doors of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas, on Sept. 25, 1957. Top row from left are Minnie Brown, Elizabeth Eckford and Ernest Green; middle row, Thelma Mothershed, Melba Pattillo and Gloria Ray; bottom row, Terrence Roberts, Jefferson Thomas and Carlotta Walls.

Right: Top row from left are Minnijean Brown Trickey, Elizabeth Eckford and Ernest Green; middle row, Thelma Mothershed Wair, Melba Pattillo Beals and Gloria Ray Karlmark; bottom row, Terrence Roberts and Carlotta Walls LaNier.

by Cameron Jarvis

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Girard Avenue

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Free Library

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Free Library

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An orange cone, and orange barrier thing, and an orange bucket.

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An orange cone, and orange barrier thing, and an orange bucket.

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Car Wash